The CMO Dilemma continues: IBM’s 2011 Global CMO Study

IBM recently released “From Stretched to Strengthened: Insights from the Global Chief Marketing Officer Study”.

The executive summary is here. To obtain the full text, go to:  http://www935.ibm.com/services/us/cmo/cmostudy2011/cmo-registration.html .

The most compelling finding is the first: CMO Underpreparedness. Thematically, it fits a number of opinions expressed in the 4ScreensMedia online journal. Data, devices and social/digital media are three of the most challenging areas for a CMO to understand and leverage. This triad, if you will, is characterised by exponential growth, the shortest of product lifecycles and the problematic aspect of measurement.

 

I highly recommend you read the report especially as a marketing professional. Getting a perspective on what’s on the mind of the global CMO is extremely valuable when it comes from a large and respected firm such as IBM.

As much as technologists are shedding light on the marketing function, marketers ought to be doing some listening of their own and thinking like ‘marketing technologists’.

– Ted Morris, 4ScreensMedia

Brand Engagement – The Lee Valley Tools Experience

No doubt you have read countless articles about the importance of brand engagement on social media. To this end many brands have scrambled to check off their to do list with the lattest Twitter or Facebook account so as to make new ‘friends’ or be ‘liked’ through these new channels.

That’s fine as far as I’m concerned but true brand engagement happens at the Moments of Truth – those places where customer and brand come together and something gets done (or not). To put it another way, when there is a moment of truth, there is an opportunity to deliver a superior customer service experience that is memorable to the customer in a positive way. In turn, customers will be satisfied, maybe delighted and at best, generate some ‘earned media’ (word-of-mouth) for your brand, the most powerful kind of recommendation and form of advertising.

The grass can be greener on all sides.

In my particular case, I needed a replacement part for my Lee Valley push mower. The part was a bolt that fits into a knob that is used to adjust the height of the roller. When I called Lee Valley with the intent of getting a replacement part, I was served immediately by a gentlemen who volunteered the following:

– 2 replacement bolts, 4 day courier delivery via UPS, free of charge.

Indeed, the parts arrived in two days and I was back in business. Not only was I pleasantly surprised but even happier to own a Lee Valley product. From a customer perspective, this was a superior and most memorable experience worth writing about for others to read especially since Lee Valley knew that I hadn’t even paid for the lawnmower as it was given to me by a neighbour who was discarding it in favour of a power mower.

As a practitioner of CRM and social media strategy, this is a fine example of genuine customer engagement by a brand this is not contrived, driven by a campaign or planted by an influencer. The Lee Valley experience was simply part of their script, as in reflective of their customer service culture and  the way they do business. 

It is clear that Lee Valley Tools own their brand and product way beyond the point that it’s in the customer’s hands as the positive perception of the brand was augmented several steps away from the original point of purchase.

Not only was this was a fine customer experience, it was very engaging.

– Ted Morris 

The Marketing Technology Landscape

I’m not 100%  sure how to address the growing complexity of the marketing function, except to suggest that you take some time to re-evaluate and redefine what marketing is about. Consider layering in your technology mix along with your media and marketing mix. Then bring together a team of mobilists, technologists, data analysts and creative folks and you can get the ball rolling.

– Ted Morris, 4ScreensMedia